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Este sería el aspecto de la Venus de Botticelli y otras figuras históricas en el siglo XXI

  • Así serían algunas figuras históricas si vivieran en la actualidad
  • Mantiene el aspecto de sus rostros pero con los estilos actuales
Imagen: iStock

Cada vez que pasamos de curso, en la escuela nos enseñan más cosas relacionadas con la historia. Si cuando somos pequeños la materia es más sencilla, a medida que pasa el tiempo completamos nuestros conocimientos, con los hechos más importantes y las figuras históricas más representativas de la historia de la humanidad.

Si por un lado conocemos la vida y la época en la que vivieron algunas figuras históricas, por otro conocemos su aspecto gracias a esculturas y diferentes pinturas. Estas obras nos muestran cómo se veían estos célebres personajes y gracias a ellas podemos ponerles rostro aunque hayan pasado cientos de años. Si bien, cada una de estas obras está elaborada según la estética de cada época y el lugar, basándose en ellas la usuaria Becca Saladin creó diferentes diseños de cómo se verían algunas figuras históricas en la actualidad.

Así sería el aspecto de algunas figuras históricas en la actualidad

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A lot of you all know that Anne Boleyn is my absolute favorite historical figure - she was my very first subject (an archived version that I would be too embarrassed to show now). I always want to work on her. I was just going to post slide 2 of Anne today, which I worked on from my previous version to just try and make her a little more realistic. I can see my skills improving with the realism of the figures over time. I found this amazing stock photo and wanted to make the seductress version of Anne. She has so many "sides" to her, as told by history. To some, she was a witch who seduced the king, and to others she was this charming, witty and intelligent woman. I leaned into the temptress trope with this version on slide one. I always add some extra substance to the lips on the Tudor portraits, because they are always painted so unreasonably tiny. Which one do you guys like better? Sexy Anne or demure Anne? . If you're interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks a month so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow. You can also make a one-time donation at www.paypal.me/royaltynow. I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: Pexels. Created using @photoshop. . #AnneBoleyn #BritishHistory #EnglishHistory #HenryVIII #KatherineofAragon #CatherineParr #AnneofCleves #KatherineHoward #JaneSeymour #Photoshop #RoyalFamily #History #Royalty #EuropeanArt #EuropeanHistory #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt #ArtOnInstagram

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Shaka Zulu is one that is pretty highly requested, but I've been resisting it because this statue is the only good depiction I found to work from, but wasn't sculpted from life - it's actually located in Camden Market in the UK. There are drawings and depictions of him (none contemporary that I know of), that depict him in this same way, so I feel it does have elements of accuracy. Even though this one may not be totally accurate, I hope you all enjoy it anyway! . Shaka kaSenzangakhona (Shaka Zulu) was a powerful South African King, ruling over the Zulu Kingdom from 1816 - 1828. He was born in 1787 near present-day Melmoth, KwaZulu-Natal Province. Shaka was the illegitimate son of the previous king, and served as a soldier in his youth. When Shaka came to power, he began to expand the empire and align with smaller neighbors to protect them from their Northern enemies, the Ndwandwe. Shaka preferred to apply diplomatic pressure over warfare. He was a master of social and propagandistic political methods, as well as a great warrior when he decided to engage. He is often depicted holding the distinctive spear and shield of the Zulu warriors. Shaka was ultimately assassinated by his own half brothers, Dingane and Mhlangana. His reputation is a bit shaky, as scholars disagree on the extent to which he revolutionized warfare methods as he is credited. Overall a really interesting figure to learn about. . If you're interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks a month so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow. You can also make a one-time donation at www.paypal.me/royaltynow. I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain (if anyone knows the actual sculptor, I was struggling to find the right credit), Right Portrait base: iStock photo. Information: based from Wikipedia. Created using @photoshop. . #ShakaZulu #SouthAfrica #AfricanHistory #AfricanArt #Zulu #ZuluWarriors #AfricanKing #Photoshop #RoyalFamily #History #Royalty #EuropeanArt #EuropeanHistory #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt #ArtOnInstagram

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So far the only holdout on all six wives of King Henry VIII on this page was Catherine Parr, the last wife. I do plan to revise and repost some other wives like Anne Boleyn and Katherine Howard, so stay tuned for those! I will do a post with them all together once I'm happy with all of them. . Catherine Parr was queen of England from 1543 - 1547. Catherine and Anne of Cleves were the lucky two that outlived King Henry VIII. Although she's one of the more forgotten wives, probably because her story is not as "sexy" as the first five, she was a fascinating figure in her own right. Catherine took a special interest in Henry's children, Edward, Mary and Elizabeth, and helped with their education. We never would have had the reign of the great Queen Elizabeth I had she not lived - Catherine was instrumental in the passing of the Act of Succession (1543) that placed Mary and Elizabeth back in the line of succession. Catherine was a devout protestant and author - she published prayer books anonymously and later published "Prayers and Meditations" and "The Lamentation of a Sinner" under her own name. Catherine served as Princess Elizabeth's guardian after the King's death in 1547, serving a critical role during this period of Tudor transition. . If you're interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow (monthly) or www.paypal.me/royaltynow (one time). I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: Pexels. Information: based from Wikipedia. Created using @photoshop. . #CatherineParr #HenryVIII #KatherineofAragon #AnneBoleyn #KatherineHoward #1500s #BritishHistory #EnglishHistory #Photoshop #RoyalFamily #History #Royalty #EuropeanArt #EuropeanHistory #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt #ArtOnInstagram

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Hatshepsut came to the throne of Egypt in 1478 BC. She ruled longer than any other female pharaoh and is regarded as being one of the most successful pharaohs in Egyptian history. Egyptologist James Henry Breasted said she is "the first great woman in history of whom we are informed." She re-established trade networks and embarked on great building projects in Egypt. There were so many statues produced during her reign that nearly every major museum that has an Ancient Egyptian exhibit has a Hatshepsut portrait. . This was obviously a very stylized statue to work from, but it was really fun to guess what she would look like nonetheless. What's interesting about the depictions of Hatshepsut is that they are very stylized in terms of the large eyes and small head, yet they are incredibly consistent across time and location. Every single portrait I've found of her has these large, kind eyes, the same shape nose, and a bit of a smile. None of the portraits of her show any age differences, so I've depicted her here as a young woman to match the smooth look of the statue. There aren't many descriptions of her appearance, but some say she was obese and perhaps balding by the end of her great reign. I've given her a skin tone that matched some of the pigment on her statues, and I'm aware this may not be correct - unfortunately we have no DNA evidence or descriptions of skin tone for her. A mummy has been attributed to her that shows diabetes and died of bone cancer in her fifties. If that mummy was indeed her, it would explain her deteriorating appearance and bad teeth in her later years. . If you're interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks a month so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow. You can also make a one-time donation at www.paypal.me/royaltynow. I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain (Metropolitan Museum), Right Portrait base: iStock Photo. . #Hatshepsut #EgyptianArt #EgyptianHistory #Pharaoh #Egypt #AfricanArt #AfricanHistory #EuropeanHistory #EuropeanArt #portrait #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt #ArtOnInstagram #Hi

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Louis XIV, known also as the Sun King, ruled France from 1643 until 1715, which is the longest reign in French history. France was a leading power during the reign of Louis, but it was a time period marked by near constant warfare. The Sun King was notoriously excessive, and he cared very much about his image and legacy. He commissioned over 300 portraits of himself during his lifetime (the portrait I've chosen here is Louis as a young man of 23). He saw maintaining the royal image as a political duty during the age of absolute monarchies in Europe. It's clear that Louis was "photoshopped" in portraits after the age of 9 when he contracted smallpox, because a single scar is never seen in portraits. Louis was focused more on projecting a mythical image of himself rather than reality (which is similar to most kings and queens throughout the ages). Who knows how close the original portrait I worked from even resembles the king, but it's a fun exercise nonetheless. I figured a man who was as extra as Louis and wore such insane wigs might have this stylish model blowout I chose on the right. If you're interested in all things Louis, follow one of my faves @leroilouisxiv . If you're interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks a month so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow. You can also make a one-time donation at www.paypal.me/royaltynow. I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: iStock Photo. . #LouisXIV #TheSunKing #SunKing #LouisXVI #LouisXV #MarieAntoinette #QueenAnne #Versailles #FrenchHistory #FrenchArt #EuropeanHistory #EuropeanArt #portrait #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt #ArtOnInstagram #HistoryNerd

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Happy Valentines day! It's only fitting to do Venus from Botticelli's famous "The Birth of Venus", painted during the height of the Italian Renaissance. The model for Venus is the gorgeous Simotta Vespucci, one of the artist's muses. I think she's one of the most beautiful females ever painted - do you think anyone tops her? Swipe to see a sneak peak of the creation video for this one, which is now live for Patreon supporters! . . As always, if you would like to support you can do so by joining the Patreon (www.patreon.com/royaltynow) or I have a "Tip Jar" here at www.paypalme/royaltynow. Any help is much appreciated. . . Left Image: Public Domain, Right Image base: with permission, @LesFleursduMallory and Gregg Thorne (Greggfoto.com)

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The Patreon pollsters have selected King Tut as the next subject! I know this is a little different than my usual post. This time, I've been given permission to use this recreation by the forensic artist (& my idol) Elisabeth Daynes (@atelier_daynes). This recreation of King Tut has long been my favorite, and was created in 2005 when 2 teams were tasked with recreating what King Tut may have looked like. It shows some of the features that may have been the result of inbreeding, such as the overbite and weak chin. I realize that the hard work here has been done for me by Daynes, but I wanted to bring him into the modern day. Hope you enjoy. . . If you would like to support my work you can do so by joining the Patreon and gaining exclusive perks like seeing posts a week before they are posted here, seeing some of my greatest failures, and watching creation videos. (www.patreon.com/royaltynow) or I have a "Tip Jar" here at www.paypalme/royaltynow. This work costs money to create, so any help is much appreciated ?? . Left Image: © reconstruction Elisabeth Daynes, Right Image pieces: iStock Photo & Pixabay.com

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